18th Dibner Library Lecture Manuscript Published

The Smithsonian Libraries has published a new Dibner Library Lecture manuscript, The Philosophical Breakfast Club and the Invention of the Scientist, by author Laura J. Snyder, associate professor of philosophy at St. John’s University in New York City. Begun in 1992, the Dibner Library Lectures feature a distinguished scholar who has made significant contributions to his or her field of study. Since 2000, the Dibner Library Lecture has become available in published more »

Meet Julia Blase!

Julia Blase is originally from Tucson, Arizona. She moved to D.C. in 2013 as part of the Library of Congress and the Institute of Museum Library and Services’s National Digital Stewardship Residency program, where she led a digital asset management project for the National Security Archive. Prior to D.C. she lived in Denver, Colorado, where she was pursuing her master of library and information science from Denver University while managing the Denali Centennial online exhibit project at the American Alpine Club Library. She also earned a master’s degree in management from the Fuqua School of Business and a bachelor’s degree in art history from Duke University.

Dibner Scholar Pamela O. Long Named MacArthur Foundation Fellow

Pamela O. Long, an independent historian of late medieval and Renaissance history and the history of science and technology, was recently awarded the prestigious MacArthur “genius grant.” The MacArthur Fellowship is an annual award to “talented individuals who have shown extraordinary originality and dedication in their creative pursuits and a marked capacity for self-direction.”  Long performed research as a Dibner Library Resident Scholar from February-April 1993. Her research topic was Openness, Secrecy, Authorship, more »

Up for Adoption: Der Weltkrieg

This cigarette card collector’s book was produced and compiled in Germany in the late 1930′s as a commemoration of World War I, providing a visual record of scenes both on the front and at home. The war theme was popular in the 1930s and was later used for propaganda purposes during the growth of Nazism.

Once There Were Billions: 100 Year Anniversary of the death Martha, the Last Passenger Pigeon

This post is written by Helen James, Curator-in-Charge, Division of Birds, National Museum of Natural History. Ask Helen a question during our Twitterchat on Tuesday, September 2nd! Martha, the last passenger pigeon, is back on public display for the first time since 1999, this time in an exhibition titled Once There Were Billions: Vanished Birds of North America that opened in the Smithsonian Libraries Exhibition Gallery of the National Museum of Natural more »

Spotlight: Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden Library

The Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden was established in 1974 as a beacon of the art of our time. This year, the museum is celebrating its 40th anniversary with a series of exhibitions and projects drawn from and inspired by our expansive library collection including Salvatore Scarpitta: Traveler Days of Endless Time, and Speculative Forms, featuring installations that re-examine key moments and figures in modern and contemporary art. Since its inception, the museum’s library more »

Adopt “Garden scene with dancers”

Garden scene with dancers (to be used as the set for a miniature theater) is a peep show (or tunnel book), designed by engraver and print-seller Martin Engelbrecht of Augsburg, Germany (1684-1756). The set includes six 6″ x 8″ hand-colored etched prints on light gray laid paper, with sections carefully cut out to create a perspective view when the prints are arranged in a viewing box.This early and rare example of a more »

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