A Concealed Reality: Léopold Sédar Senghor’s years in captivity

 The blog post was written by Xavier Courouble for the Warren M. Robbins Library, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution, on the occasion of the 75th anniversary of Léopold Sédar Senghor’s release from World War II internment camps.   A Concealed Reality: Léopold Sédar Senghor’s years in captivity “Il faut longtemps, très longtemps, pour que resurgisse à la lumière ce qui a été effacé”[1] –Patrick Modiano, in Dora Bruder, 1997 In more »

Catesby in the Classroom: Students Explore the Intersection of Art and Science

In the early eighteenth century, English naturalist Mark Catesby set foot in a New World. After spending the better part of ten years, spread across two separate trips, exploring and documenting North America’s rich biodiversity, he would eventually publish his research and original artworks as the first fully illustrated book on the flora and fauna of North America.    Published over eighteen years between 1729-1747, The Natural History of Carolina, Florida, and more »

Le Garde-Meuble and Parisian Interior Design

This post was written by Brittney Falter, a graduate student at George Mason University and social media intern at the Smithsonian Libraries. Le Garde-meuble, ancien et moderne (Furniture repository, ancient and modern), was a bimonthly periodical published in Paris between 1839 and 1935. It contained many illustrations of furniture designs and room settings, created by Desire Guilmard. His drawings featured both historical revivals and styles that were modern at the time. The more »

Saved from Staples: Treating a metal-stapled pamphlet

Pamphlets, brochures, and other publications of thin width, are often bound with metal staples. The passage of time and environmental conditions, such as high humidity, may sometimes cause staples to corrode. Rust, flaking off of the metal, can stain and damage the integrity of the surrounding paper. To help maintain the longevity of an item that has suffered this type of damage, it is best to remove the staples and effect repairs more »

Color and Light

This is a guest post from Carl Minchew, Vice President Color Innovation & Design at Benjamin Moore, the sponsor of Color in a New Light. See Color in a New Light in the National Museum of Natural History before in closes in March 2017! As a paint company, we at Benjamin Moore take color communication very seriously. When we talk with designers, consumers, painters, or students about color we always start with the more »

The ABC’s of the Corcoran Artist Files: the D’s

    In the series called “The ABCs of the Corcoran Artist Files” the American Art and Portrait Gallery (AA/PG) Library will explore artists through the materials from the recent Corcoran Vertical File Collection donation by featuring artists whose surnames begin with that letter. This time we are looking at the artists whose last names that start with D.

The charming world of Walter Crane

This post was written by Brittney Falter, a graduate student at George Mason University and social media intern at the Smithsonian Libraries. Walter Crane was born on the 15th August, 1845 in Liverpool, England. His father, Thomas, was a portrait painter, which allowed Walter to take an interest in art as a child. He would often work in his father’s studio and gained knowledge and experience of the artistic world. After his father’s death, Walter was offered an apprenticeship with William James Linton at his engraving shop.[1]

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