Ad-hoc Reporting and Use of SRO

Since the earliest days of the Smithsonian Research Online (SRO), we have sometimes thought of the program as a distinct branch library just like any other. The notable exception is that SRO items are not printed materials but rather digital, and we use a different catalog or finding aid for the items. But other than that, the SRO processes materials in much the same way as a typical library by selecting, acquiring and cataloging items as the program has grown.

Catesby in the Classroom: Students Explore the Intersection of Art and Science

In the early eighteenth century, English naturalist Mark Catesby set foot in a New World. After spending the better part of ten years, spread across two separate trips, exploring and documenting North America’s rich biodiversity, he would eventually publish his research and original artworks as the first fully illustrated book on the flora and fauna of North America.    Published over eighteen years between 1729-1747, The Natural History of Carolina, Florida, and more »

Help us discover #WhereDidWonderGo?

I See Wonder is a resource designed for educators that provides a wonderful way to spark inquiry, analysis, and discussion. By visually exploring our images, you can bring the Smithsonian Libraries collections into your classroom. Use I See Wonder as a morning exercise, a way to introduce a new topic, or to discover your students’ interests. Share what you See.  Awaken your Wonder. All through February start your journey and help us find our missing mascot, WONDER.  Jump into the scavenger more »

January Events at Smithsonian Libraries

The Smithsonian Libraries would like to invite our colleagues to two January events, both of which are free and open to the public. More details are below. We hope you’ll join us!     Color in the Scientific Image Mazviita Chirimuuta, Department of History and Philosophy of Science, University of Pittsburgh 6:00pm, Friday, January 13, 2017 Warner Bros Theater at the National Museum of American History 12th Street and Constitution Ave NW more »

Consider a gift for Giving Tuesday

2016 has been a landmark year for the Smithsonian Libraries. Because of donors like you, the Libraries is able to continue in its role as the pinnacle of museum libraries, serving as a scholarly resource for Smithsonian researchers and curators and for brilliant thinkers from all around the world, as well as increasing access into our collections for learners of all ages. Some examples of what we have been able to accomplish more »

Celebrating Our Man of Many Hats: William Henry Holmes

December 1st is the 170th birthday of William Henry Holmes, the Smithsonian’s own Renaissance man. Early in the Smithsonian’s history, Holmes served as the head of the Anthropology Department and later the first director of what would become the Smithsonian American Art Museum. Starting today, we’re celebrating his legacy.

An Ozzy Interview, or The Librarian and The Collector

The Smithsonian Libraries are contributing an Ozzy blog post in honor of The National Museum of American History’s kickstarter campaign to #Keep Them Ruby. Sometimes referred to as “the Harry Potter of its time”, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz was an enormous success. Published in 1900, author L. Frank Baum and illustrator W.W. Denslow created what is widely regarded as America’s first fairytale. The popularity grew into a series of 40 stories, more »

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