Lindbergh’s legacy at the Smithsonian Libraries

Charles Lindbergh, born on February 4th, 1902, made history in his aviation career as the first man to fly solo across the Atlantic.  “Lucky Lindy” soon became an American icon – flying his Spirit of St. Louis to all fifty states to promote air travel and advising airlines.  The Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum Library is the proud home to many unique items that represent Lindbergh’s legacy, both in aviation and more »

Birthday of Anne Morrow Lindbergh

Anne Morrow Lindbergh was also a prolific author. Her most famous work, Gift from the Sea, was originally published in 1955. This lyrical essay-style book was inspired by a visit to Captiva Island off the coast of Florida. In this introspective book Mrs. Lindbergh uses the natural imagery of the seashells found on the island’s beaches to reflect on the life of the American woman in the 20th century.

Lindbergh Flight Day (1927)

On May 20, 1927, at 7:52 a.m., Charles A. Lindbergh, an air mail pilot, flew from New York to Paris, arriving at 10:22 p.m. the next day. He flew 3610 miles and became the first man to fly non-stop across the Atlantic alone, breaking the non-stop distance record for an airplane. The sources listed below provide a window into aviation history and help capture the excitement and romance of a major breakthrough in air travel.

And out of the night came a silver bird . . .

Charles A. Lindbergh, We: The Famous Flier's Own Story of His Life and His Transatlantic Flight, 1927, And out of the night came a silver bird bearing a boy who carried letters of introduction to Paris.   . . . bearing a boy who carried letters of introduction to Paris. Charles Augustus Lindbergh was born today, in 1902. The libraries has memorabilia of his historic flight in its National Air & Space Museum Library in the form of sheet music, biographies, an autobiography and much, much, more.—Elizabeth Periale

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