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Tag: Elizabeth Broman

So you want to build something…

Builder and Woodworker. “Medieval door.” Vol. 31, no.6 June 1895. Plate 16. NA1. A43 CHMRU
Builder and Woodworker. “Medieval door.” Vol. 31, no.6 June 1895. Plate 16.

The Cooper Hewitt Library collects a variety of trade periodicals, especially those dealing with architecture and the building trades. The Architect, builder and woodworker is a journal of industrial art that offers practical and technical information for anyone with the skill and interest in designing a home or other building. We own nearly 100 issues ranging from 1875-1895. Architecture as a profession at this time was just emerging; master builders, draftsmen, and craftsmen created structures and the features and furnishings in them

Cooper Hewitt Pro-Seminar Series: Ornamente by Bruno Mauder

Ornamente, by Bruno Mauder. (L:) Titlepage. (R:) Plate 5.
Ornamente, by Bruno Mauder. (L:) Titlepage. (R:) Plate 5

 

Studying Design

All incoming students in The New School Parsons History of Design and Curatorial Studies (MA) Masters’ Degree Program at the Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum take an object and research based class called Pro-Seminar.

Musical stuffed bunnies still sing it…..

Red orange cover of sheet music for 1933 musical revue As Thousands Cheer.
(L:) As Thousands Cheer. Irving Berlin Inc. of New York City, 1933. The bright red cover has a bottom silhouette illustration of people jubilantly marching in the Easter parade. Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Library (uncat)

“Easter Parade” is still a popular song- lots of little kids today know this old tune from their musical animal toys. You might know the lyrics and tune to sing along with the first 2 lines of the chorus of  “In your Easter bonnet, with all the frills upon it…”  Written by Irving Berlin in 1933, the song was also the basis of the iconic 1948 movie musical starring Judy Garland and Fred Astaire. The song was introduced by Marilyn Miller and Clifton Webb on Broadway as part of the musical revue As Thousands Cheer (1933), in which musical numbers were strung together on the thematic thread of newspaper headlines and the lives of rich and famous people.

A Wordless Novel – Gods’ Man

Gods' Man
Gods’ Man

The Cooper Hewitt Library regularly collaborates with the Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum on exhibitions and publications, providing images, books and other related materials from our Special Collections that complement the theme of a show. We are often asked to seek out new materials for possible inclusion in upcoming exhibitions. This past summer, in looking for books and related materials from the 1920’s and early 30’s for an exhibition, the Library acquired several novels selected for their Art Deco-style graphic dustjackets. A beautifully illustrated book with a striking black and white dust jacket titled Gods’ man : a novel in woodcuts , by the artist printmaker Lynd Ward (1905-1985) aroused my curiosity. It was what was referred to at the time of its publication in 1929 a “wordless novel” – what we can refer to today as the “graphic novel”. It is a narrative genre that uses sequences of captionless pictures to tell a story. Gods’ man was the first of six wordless novels created by Lynd Ward during the years 1929- 1974, and the first American wordless novel.

Pop-Up-O-Philes in Philly

The Movable Book Society 10th Biennial Conference. Philadelphia, Sept 18-20, 2014

Left: Elizabeth Broman, Cooper-Hewitt Librarian and Pop-up artist Sam Ita. Right: Pop-up artist Colette Fu and Stephen Van Dyk, Cooper-Hewitt Branch Librarian
Left: Elizabeth Broman, Cooper-Hewitt Librarian and Pop-up artist Sam Ita. Right: Pop-up artist Colette Fu and Stephen Van Dyk, Cooper-Hewitt Branch Librarian.

 

This was my very first pop-up book conference and I came away absolutely charged up, inspired and quite proud of our pop-up book collection here at the Cooper-Hewitt Museum Library. I’ve been a member of the Movable Book Society for a number of years, and add the quarterly newsletter, Movable Stationery, to our serial collection, which has been fully digitized and available online. It is indexed on the Movable Book Society website.

Fashion for Hair – A creepiness I like

The Cooper-Hewitt National Design Library owns many types of pattern books for architecture, textiles, wall coverings, and ornament for use by designers. Among our more unusual “how to” pattern books and trade catalogs are two recently digitized hair jewelry pattern books – The jewellers’ book of patterns in hair work and Charles T. Menge’s price list of ornamental hair jewelry and device work.