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New July Acquisitions!

Check out these new acquisitions at the National Museum of American History Library!

You’ll never look at barbecue the same after reading Savage
Barbecue: race, culture, and the invention of America’s first food

However, it is meant in a good, feed-your-mind way.  As guessed from its
self-explanatory title, this book examines the racial and cultural context
throughout barbecue’s history from when Columbus first arrived in the Americas
to the early 20th century.  Illustrations pertaining to
barbecue throughout the centuries are also featured through the book.

Warnes, Andrew. Savage Barbecue: race, culture, and the invention
of America’s first food
. Athens, GA: University of Georgia Press, 2008.


Harper's Weekly, 1864, General Grant receiving his commission as Lieutenant-General from President LincolnHarper's Weekly, 1864, General Grant receiving his commission as Lieutenant-General from President Lincoln

Think you know everything about Abraham Lincoln?  Think
again.  Known for being the 16th President of the United
States, Abraham Lincoln is little known for being an inventor.  In , Lincoln the Inventor, Lincoln’s mechanical inclinations throughout his life are
examined and the complete story behind Lincoln’s patented invention, “a device
to buoy vessels over shoals,” is revealed. Also contained within this book are
appendixes featuring reprints Lincoln’s patent papers and drafts of his first
and second lectures on discoveries and inventions.  Incidentally,
Lincoln’s Patent Model is featured
in the exhibit Abraham
Lincoln: An Extraordinary Life
at the National Museum of American
History.

Emerson, Jason. Lincoln
the Inventor
. Carbondale, IL: Southern Illinois University Press, 2009.

Continue to nourish your mind with some Chocolate:
History, Culture, and Heritage
.
  This book features fifty-six in-depth
scholarly chapters focusing on the history of chocolate’s — and cacao’s —
mostly in the Americas and a small amount in Europe and Asia from pre-Columbian
to Civil War eras.  As explored in these chapters, chocolate is present in
many historical aspects of culture, faith, and every-day life such as business,
education, and medicine.  If you’re craving for more chocolate-related
scholarship and feel inspired, the fifty-sixth chapter gives suggestions for
further potential research areas in chocolate. Yum.

Grivetti, Louis. Chocolate:
History, Culture, and Heritage
. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc,
2009.

Interested in transportation-related history after seeing
the America
on the Move
exhibit at the National
Museum of American History
? Check out Eat my dust: early women motorists
before it speeds away. Learn about women’s history through personal
stories of women from the United States, Britain, and Australia during the
early days of motoring—think 1880s—until 1930s. By pursuing their
love of cars, these women challenged societal norms and paved progress for
women. An included “Essay on Sources” gives a wonderful source of its own
for further readings about women and transportation.

Clarsen, Georgine.  Eat my dust: early women motorists.
Baltimore, MD: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2008.

—by Mary Jinglewski

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