Saved from Staples: Treating a metal-stapled pamphlet

Pamphlets, brochures, and other publications of thin width, are often bound with metal staples. The passage of time and environmental conditions, such as high humidity, may sometimes cause staples to corrode. Rust, flaking off of the metal, can stain and damage the integrity of the surrounding paper. To help maintain the longevity of an item that has suffered this type of damage, it is best to remove the staples and effect repairs more »

Color and Light

This is a guest post from Carl Minchew, Vice President Color Innovation & Design at Benjamin Moore, the sponsor of Color in a New Light. See Color in a New Light in the National Museum of Natural History before in closes in March 2017! As a paint company, we at Benjamin Moore take color communication very seriously. When we talk with designers, consumers, painters, or students about color we always start with the more »

Two Dibner Library Manuscripts Published

The proceedings of the symposium we held to celebrate the 25th Anniversary of the Dibner Library have now been published. Called The Era of Experiments and the Age of Wonder: Scientific Expansion from the Seventeenth to the Nineteenth Centuries, it features the keynote address of Richard Holmes, a well-known British biographer. We have also published Engineering Romance in Late 19th Century Literature by Rosalind Williams, Bern Dibner Professor of the History of Science and Technology at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Jules Verne (1828-1905) and Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894) were well-known writers of romance in the late l9th century. They were also fascinated by engineering, both as well-informed observers and as lay engineers. This manuscript describes this convergence of engineering and romance in their lives and times and reflects upon its implications for our own lives and times. To request a published copy of our Dibner manuscripts, call 202.633.1522. Save

Cycling into the Past: Late 19th Century Bicycles

Today in the 21st Century, it’s not uncommon for people to ride bicycles to work. Even on these cold winter days, there seems to be at least a few people out on their bikes. But let’s take a look back to see what your bicycle might have looked like in the late 19th Century.

Monique Libby Receives ARL Scholarship

Monique Libby, digital library technician, has been selected by the Association of Research Libraries Committee on Diversity and Leadership as a scholar in the Initiative to Recruit a Diverse Workforce. She is one of only 18 candidates chosen, and will complete her Master of Library Science at the University of Maryland, College Park. Monique also received a 2016-2017 Spectrum Scholarship from the American Library Association’s Office of Diversity. Congrats, Monique! Save Save Save

Finding treasures for digitization in the Research Annex

The post was written by Mark Coulbourne, Towson University student and fall intern in the Smithsonian Libraries Research Annex. For the Fall Semester I was an intern at the Smithsonian Libraries Research Annex (SLRA), and was tasked with evaluating 19th and early 20th century monographs for digitization. My work with librarian Daria Wingreen-Mason centered on the areas of photography, exploration, Alaska, and zoology.

The ABC’s of the Corcoran Artist Files: the D’s

    In the series called “The ABCs of the Corcoran Artist Files” the American Art and Portrait Gallery (AA/PG) Library will explore artists through the materials from the recent Corcoran Vertical File Collection donation by featuring artists whose surnames begin with that letter. This time we are looking at the artists whose last names that start with D.

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