Cooper Hewitt Pro-Seminar Series: Embracing ‘Phobia’

All incoming students in The New School Parsons History of Design and Curatorial Studies (MA) Masters’ Degree Program at the Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum take an object and research based class called Pro-Seminar. This course trains students in conducting formal analyses, writing catalog entries, and making visual presentations that require students to conduct and integrate primary and secondary source research.  Students select one work from the museum collection to study during this more »

Adding flair with a graphic design internship

This post was written by Amber Collins, graphic design intern during Summer 2016. Hi, my name is Amber. I am an undergraduate student at the University of Chicago studying Visual Art. I am most interested in analog processes of image making as well as museology, particularly the curatorial design of Marcel Duchamp and El Lissitzky. I had the wonderful opportunity to spend the summer working at the Smithsonian. I interned for the Smithsonian Libraries’ Advancement Office as a Graphic Design intern. With my supervisors’ (Allie Swislocki, Anna Ogg, and Liz O’Brien) vision and guidance, I created design materials for a number of Smithsonian Libraries’ events.

Highlights from the Cultural Heritage Library: All-Caps Edition

There may be a bit of truth to observations that we’re less patient now than we used to be. Look at this article found in the 41st  volume of Merchants Record and Show Window. This month we show the capitals which belong to the three lower case alphabets shown last month.

Fortune Magazine – 80th Anniversary

Fortune Magazine was created as part of Henry Luce’s Time, Inc. publishing empire in February 1930, four months after the Stock market crash that started the Great Depression. It was created as an expanded and specialized publication drawn from the business section of Time magazine, written and designed with big executives and upper level managers in mind. The original prospectus stated that “business is the single common denominator of interest among the active leading citizens of the U.S . . . Fortune’s purpose is to reflect Industrial Life in ink and paper, and word and picture as the finest skyscraper reflects it in steel and architecture”.  Fortune’s annual listing of the 500 leading corporations, “the Fortune 500”, as it is known, became an American institution, against which all other businesses are measured.  Among its many innovative editorial approaches was to publish a standard feature article that examined different aspects of a single corporation, much like a biographical portrait. Henry Luce believed that all business was invested with a public interest, more »

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