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A Carousel Holiday Decoration

The Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Library has nearly 2,000 movable and pop-up books, that are made with a variety of paper construction types and mechanisms that control the movement of the action on the pages. One type of movable book form is a carousel book. A carousel looks like an ordinary flat two dimensional book, but when opened, it unfolds into a 360 degree circle when stood upright.     A carousel more »

The Wondrous Winter Wonderland that was 16th-Century Sweden

An entry into this magical season can be gained through the Historia de gentibus septentrionalibus (History of the Northern Peoples) by Olaus Magnus, first published in Rome in 1555. It is a work greatly valued by Smithsonian curators and researchers and other scholars, since the author – a true Renaissance man – wrote down his geographical, anthropological and naturalistic observations of a land unknown to much of Europe of the time. In more »

The Fix – Ein Wintermärchen, an Adopt-a-Book Story

  Ein Wintermärchen (a winter story) is a children’s book from our Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum Library. The library holds an extensive collection of children’s books, around 2,000, with 1,200 being pop-up books. This particular volume came to the Book Conservation Lab through the Adopt-A-Book program.     The book is lavishly illustrated by Ernst Kreidolf, a well-known Swiss children’s book illustrator. Many of his books depict fairies and other mythical creatures, more »

Sleigh there

No heated seats or four wheel drive here! If you think you had a hard time dealing with the ice and snow that hit much of the U.S. recently, be grateful that at least your mode of transportation had a roof!

SNOW – Friend of the Enemy

Now that it’s melting we can all laugh . . . Right? Right? —Elizabeth Periale

Brrr…

Today is the first day of winter. Some Ella Jenkins music might get you in the right, chilly mood.—Elizabeth Periale Image from: Jules Verne, From the Earth to the Moon Direct in Ninety-seven Hours and Twenty Minutes, and a Trip around it. Trans. by Louis Mercier and Eleanor King [De la terre à la lune], 1874, THE VAPOR OF OUR BREATH WILL FALL IN SNOW AROUND US—As the voyagers move into the moon's shadow, the projectile encounters the "absolute cold of space" causing their breath to condense as snow. More images from this publication are available. Also, check out the Libraries' online display, A Jules Verne Centennial: 1905 – 2005.

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