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Author: Liz O'Brien

Smithsonian Libraries Opens “Magnificent Obsessions”

The Smithsonian Libraries presents a new exhibition, “Magnificent Obsessions: Why We Collect,” at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History beginning Nov. 7. “Magnificent Obsessions” will be on display through July 1, 2020.

 

 

“Magnificent Obsessions” tells the captivating stories of the book collectors whose diverse interests and passions helped shape—and continue to contribute to—the Smithsonian Libraries. Through rare books, manuscripts and other intriguing items from across the varied Libraries of the Smithsonian, the exhibition highlights the personal motivations and enduring impact of book collectors who were compelled to share their “magnificent obsessions” with the nation.

Smithsonian Launches Profiles of Scholarly Experts

Homepage of Profiles.si.edu

The Smithsonian has introduced Smithsonian Profiles, a searchable directory of the Smithsonian’s scholarly experts.

The Smithsonian’s dedication to research supports hundreds of staff scholars and every year it attracts more than 1,000 fellows and research associates from around the world, all of whom work within the Institution’s 19 museums, nine research centers, three cultural centers and the National Zoo. Smithsonian Profiles outlines the expertise of current Smithsonian-affiliated scholars, connecting its audiences with curators, historians, researchers and fellows who continually discover new knowledge to share worldwide.

Opening this week: Cultivating America’s Gardens

C. Ribsam & Sons trade card. Courtesy of Smithsonian Gardens.

Smithsonian Libraries and Smithsonian Gardens will present a new exhibition, “Cultivating America’s Gardens,” at the National Museum of American History May 4 through August 2018.

Amateurs and professionals, young and old, schoolchildren and scientists—Americans of every sort—have put their backs into gardening for a variety of motives: beauty, food, science and prestige. Americans garden to feed themselves and their families and to create a sense of place and beauty in their backyards and beyond. National parks, public parks and gardens and the individual plots of earth that people cultivate are all examples of their deep connections to the natural world. American garden making has evolved over time, shaped by history, social attitudes, the environment and new ideas.