Press "Enter" to skip to content

Author: Erin Rushing

Erin handles rights and reproductions for Smithsonian Libraries' images. She also has an outreach role in the Libraries, coordinating social media and the blog, Unbound, and managing the internship program. She holds an M.L.S from the University of Maryland, as well as a BA in History and Art History.

A Day at a Convivium

Conviviium Keynote Session
Keynote Session

One of the truly wonderful “perks” of working at the Smithsonian Institution is being able to participate in presentations of current research.  Recently I was lucky enough to attend a daylong Science Convivium at the Front Royal, Virginia headquarters of the National Zoological Park’s science arm, the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute (SCBI).  What’s a convivium, you ask?  Briefly, according to Webster’s Third New International Dictionary a convivium is a convivial gathering.   Hmmm, alright.  And if you’re being convivial you’re “relating to, or occupied with feasting, drinking, and good company”.  Well, there was definitely good company, a nice lunch and a wine and cheese social hour in the afternoon!

Researching Floras for the Botany – Horticulture Library

The Flora of China

This post was written by Alice Doolittle, a 2011 summer intern on the Botany-Horticulture Library. Interested in working with us this summer? Now is the time to apply! Visit our internship webpage. Applications close April 30th. 

For a biologist who is also an aspiring librarian, what could be better than to spend the summer in the stacks within the National Museum of Natural History? During the summer of 2011, I spent several weeks at the Botany – Horticulture Library as a Professional Development Intern for Smithsonian Institution Libraries.

West Africa, 1902: A Clash of Cultures

In honor of National Volunteer Week, please enjoy this illuminating post by National Museum of African Art branch library volunteer, Judy Schaefer. Judy is one of many hard working volunteers at the Smithsonian Libraries and we appreciate each and every one!

In 1902, Commander Eugène Lenfant traveled from Paris to Lake Chad in a mere 75 days.  He was looking for a cheap, fast, and humane way to supply the French Sudan—”Afrique française” on the map—and he found one by ascending the Niger, Benue, Kebi, and Chari rivers all the way to the lake.