New and Notable—Cooper-Hewitt Design Museum Library

The Libraries would like to highlight some new titles that have been added recently to the Cooper-Hewitt Design Museum Library.

New and Notable—Cooper-Hewitt Design Museum Library

The Libraries would like to highlight some new titles that have been added recently to the Cooper-Hewitt Design Museum Library.

Bringing Beautiful Gardens Indoors — Landscape Garden, Design, and History Collections at the Libraries

While the Smithsonian Institution Libraries (SIL) comprises 20 branch libraries, some branch collections naturally overlap when meeting the needs of their library users. That’s the situation with one of our art libraries, the Cooper-Hewitt Design Museum Library located in New York City, and one of our science libraries, the Botany and Horticulture Library located in Washington D.C. It may surprise you to learn both collect books and journals on landscape design and history and the decorative arts.

New and Notable—Cooper-Hewitt Design Museum Library

The Libraries would like to highlight some new titles that have been added recently to the Cooper-Hewitt Design Museum Library.

The Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum Library Welcomes Intern Stephanie Romano

Besides being a naturally busy place, the Cooper-Hewitt Library will be moving during 2011 and so there is much to be done! During this Spring 2011 semester, Stephanie Romano will be working on an analysis of selected titles for possible de-accession

New and Notable—Cooper-Hewitt Design Museum Library

The Libraries would like to highlight some new titles that have been added recently to the Cooper-Hewitt Design Museum Library.

Fortune Magazine – 80th Anniversary

Fortune Magazine was created as part of Henry Luce’s Time, Inc. publishing empire in February 1930, four months after the Stock market crash that started the Great Depression. It was created as an expanded and specialized publication drawn from the business section of Time magazine, written and designed with big executives and upper level managers in mind. The original prospectus stated that “business is the single common denominator of interest among the active leading citizens of the U.S . . . Fortune’s purpose is to reflect Industrial Life in ink and paper, and word and picture as the finest skyscraper reflects it in steel and architecture”.  Fortune’s annual listing of the 500 leading corporations, “the Fortune 500”, as it is known, became an American institution, against which all other businesses are measured.  Among its many innovative editorial approaches was to publish a standard feature article that examined different aspects of a single corporation, much like a biographical portrait. Henry Luce believed that all business was invested with a public interest, more »

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