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Tag: research

Smithsonian Scholars Named 2018 Highly Cited Researchers

Nine Smithsonian scholars are included in Clarivate Analytic’s 2018 Highly Cited Researchers list, an annual list of influential researchers across 21 fields. These Smithsonian scholars join some 4000 researchers from other institutions who appear in the top 1% of scholars in their respective disciplines, based on citations to their publications dating between 2006 and 2016. The Smithsonian Libraries tracks the research output of the Smithsonian Institution and makes it publicly available through Smithsonian Research Online and the newly launched Smithsonian Profiles.

Smithsonian Launches Profiles of Scholarly Experts

Homepage of Profiles.si.edu

The Smithsonian has introduced Smithsonian Profiles, a searchable directory of the Smithsonian’s scholarly experts.

The Smithsonian’s dedication to research supports hundreds of staff scholars and every year it attracts more than 1,000 fellows and research associates from around the world, all of whom work within the Institution’s 19 museums, nine research centers, three cultural centers and the National Zoo. Smithsonian Profiles outlines the expertise of current Smithsonian-affiliated scholars, connecting its audiences with curators, historians, researchers and fellows who continually discover new knowledge to share worldwide.

Diving into Marine Biodiversity and Coastal Ecosystem Research

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Dean Janiak

On the eastern coast of Florida, about 120 miles north of Miami, there is a very special research center: the Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce. It serves as a field station specializing in marine biodiversity and Florida ecosystems, especially that of the Indian River Lagoon – one of the most biologically-diverse estuaries in North America. The center is a destination for scientists around the world who are interested in studying the extraordinary biodiversity in the area as well as ocean and coastal processes at large.

A spoonful of sugar makes the medicine go down

This is the second post in a two-part series. Catch up on the first part hereAllegra Tennis interned with the Field Book Project and Metadata Services over the summer to investigate Smithsonian research related to countries with populations of under a million.

I came to the field of librarianship from a scientific background.  The processes, details, and discoveries to be made have always held a magical quality for me.  As I grew up and talked with others, I began to notice that not everyone views science in this way.  Many people seem to be interested in science, whether in the idea of it, the usefulness of it, or they raw beauty of it.  Yet too often people are intimidated by science, either by the research or by the researchers themselves.

No Wheat Chex, and other scientific issues of the 1960s

This is the first post in a two-part series.

Lawrence N. Huber devoted several pages of his journal lamenting the fact that the Navy vessel he was aboard had run out of Wheat Chex.  This comes from a young man who was out in the middle of the Pacific Ocean, banding thousands of often rather uncooperative birds, making observations of any type of fauna he came across in the Pacific Islands, and swimming in the ocean with open abrasions with the stated intention of attracting sharks.  All these things to write about (which he also does), but his main complaints revolve around food, the quality of it, the quantity of it, and the absence of it, as in the case of his beloved Wheat Chex.

Discovering Hidden Treasures at the National Postal Museum Library

Researchers in the National Postal Museum Library.
Researchers in the National Postal Museum Library.

While working at the National Postal Museum (NPM) Library, we often stumble upon treasures that are waiting to be discovered. We find them in boxes of donations, tucked away on a shelf, behind cabinets, and underneath metal file drawers, but sometimes they are hidden in plain sight.

Computers and Washington

Last fall, I marked the season for the harvesting of grapes to honor John Adlum, the little-known “Father of American Viticulture.” The origins of the first commercially viable vine in the American wine industry can be traced to the District of Columbia.

Now, with the great interest in Alan Turing, the recent auction sale of this English mathematician’s 56-page notebook for more than a million dollars, and the success of the movie, “The Imitation Game,” let’s look at another (and earlier) computer pioneer genius, Herman Hollerith, and the importance of his Washington invention. Hollerith was, as stated in the title of his principle biography, “The forgotten giant of information processing.” Again, it was the beginning of a huge industry—surprisingly but not at all incidentally—in the nation’s capital.